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Metalcasters Receive Their Five Minutes of Fame

While most metalcasters don’t join the industry for the glamour, two metalcasting facilities have had their share of fame on recent television programs.

Interestingly enough, each facility received attention for civil war period casting replicas.

Kent Foundry Co., Greenville, Mich., attracted The Discovery Channel’s show “How it’s Made,” when the channel heard about the facility’s Civil War cannon replicas. The facility produces these castings for South Bend Replicas, according to The Grand Rapids Press.

Kent Foundry’s niche market is making 25 pieces or fewer for single customers, which is a perfect fit with the cannon replica market.

Clarksville Foundry, Clarksville, Tenn., cast a replica component of Confederate submarine H.L. Hunly, the first submarine ever to sink an enemy ship. H.L., to discover what caused the damage to the submarine. National Geographic Channel aired the facility’s analysis and results mid-September in “Secret Weapon of the Confederacy.”


Metalcaster Uncovers Answer to Submarine Damage on TV Show

While the sky may be the limit for most metalcasting facilities, Clarksville Foundry’s abilities stretch all the way to the ocean floor.

Clarksville Foundry, Clarksville, Tenn., cast a replica component of Confederate submarine H.L. Hunly, the first submarine ever to sink an enemy ship. H.L. Hunley had sunk twice, both times being raised and returned to use. Soon after sinking the USS Housatonic in 1864 on Charleston, S.C.’s, outer harbor, the submarine sunk again and wasn’t raised from the wreckage until August 2000.

After a metallurgical analysis of the chemical properties of the iron used in the Civil War period, Clarksville Foundry cast the component. National Geographic Channel will reveal the results of what caused the damage on the submarine on Sept. 15 at 9 p.m., ET/PT in “Secret Weapon of the Confederacy.”
 

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