Didion: See How One brass foundry reclaimed $321,867 in three months.

Flip the Calendar

Come January, it always takes me a couple weeks to get used to writing the new year when I’m signing something, writing a check or dating a letter. I know it’s not 2016 anymore, but by habit there I’ll scribble it, then cross it out and correct it. 

We do a lot of things by habit or routine in work and at home. It makes us efficient and frees up brain space to think about other non-rote things. We don’t need to process how to accomplish a task; the steps have already been mapped out, memorized and engaged.

Pulling together an issue of Modern Casting is the result of routines. Weekly editorial meetings. Daily check-ins. Standard deadlines, copyediting processes, and page design procedures. Before each issue, the magazine team does not have to answer the question, “How do we go about making a magazine? The template has been established.

But as helpful as habit and routine are, like 2016, eventually they become outdated. When that happens, quality—of life or product—suffers.

Because it’s the first month of a new year, January is when many of us think about a fresh start, as trite as that sounds. Fresh starts are needed. The last 12 months have some baggage and they will continue to load us down until we remember to flip to the next year. Perhaps it was the sale that took forever to close or position that could never stay filled or a bottleneck that was perpetually delaying delivery.

This is a good time to examine what continues to work well and what doesn’t. Sometimes, difficult projects are one-offs and just need to be let go. Other times they are signs that the current routine needs to be re-evaluated. So either move on or start figuring out a new way of accomplishing your goal. Don’t keep writing 2016 when it is 2017.

I invite you to share ways you or your company has created an improved routine by emailing me at swetzel@afsinc.org. And because Modern Casting is always looking for a fresh perspective, please send along your thoughts on what you’d like to see in the magazine.

Have a happy New Year.

Click here to see this story as it appears in MODERN CASTING.


Manage Your Time

Time management is one of the biggest issues facing employees and employers today. Whether it’s because of a growing list of tasks, increasingly complicated duties, non-work problems that need to be taken care of, or just an inability to get off Twitter or Facebook during business hours, it feels like managing those precious minutes gets harder by the month for anybody who has even a modicum of responsibility during work.

In his book “Procrastinate on Purpose: 5 Permissions to Multiply Your Time,” New York Times bestselling author Rory Vaden writes knowingly and seems all too familiar with time crunches. He spells out in plain language ways to make your time matter more, and how not to waste it with surprisingly simple and intuitive ideas.

(Not that it matters, but the title of the book is ironic and catchy. It’s not iconic like “Steal This Book,” but certainly memorable.)

To get his points across to the reader, Vaden breaks up his advice into five “permissions” on what he calls a “Focus Funnel.” They are:
• Eliminate: The Permission to Ignore.
• Automate: The Permission to Invest.
• Delegate: The Permission of Imperfect.
• Procrastinate: The Permission of Incomplete.
• Concentrate: The Permission to Protect.

All of these ideas have value and Vaden gets them across impressively efficiently. The part that had the most relevance for me (of course, your mileage may vary) was on concentration. I have a habit of, well, wasting time until I need to get on deadline and have to accomplish something. Sometimes that means I’m rushing a lot more than I should be. And even though I end up getting things done, it’s more stressful than necessary.

It turns out, this is healthy, albeit in the reverse. In the chapter that focuses on this topic, Vaden goes into detail about working double-time at the start of a task when necessary, so you can have free time later. He also effectively mentioned farmers and how they harvest when they have to harvest, that at times there’s nothing they can do to avoid it and how it has to be a priority for them.

(Trust me, this makes sense in the context of the book.)

In general, “Procrastinate on Purpose: 5 Permissions to Multiply Your Time” is a valuable book for any professional who struggles with managing their precious minutes. I certainly fall into that category and will take many of the lessons with me as I continue my writing. And maybe I’ll be more efficient on my next deadline.  

Click here to see this story as it appears in MODERN CASTING.


Time to Boost Economic Growth

In the late 1990s, dot-com companies that had yet to generate a profit were trading at astronomical valuations. Traditional measures like price-to-earning ratios, we were told, were obsolete in an era when eyeballs and clicks were the metrics du jour. It didn’t take long, though, for the market to crash. It turned out the longstanding investment rules developed by the likes of Benjamin Graham and Phillip Fisher were timeless and trusty, not outdated and crusty.

Over the past eight years, there has been another “new normal.” Over that time, the U.S. has failed to enjoy even a single year of 3% economic growth. Not surprisingly, this lackluster performance has led to diminished economic opportunity and tax revenues. Even as the unemployment rate gradually inched back to 4.9 percent, the numbers of people who dropped out of the workforce has been staggering.

This has been the slowest economic recovery over the last 75 years. Some people have bought into the argument that we are destined to perpetual growth rates of 1 to 2 percent. Yet, this seeming new normal need not be a permanent reality. With the right public policies, robust growth is again possible. With that growth would come more demand for products that contain cast metals, as well as other goods and services. Better opportunities for entrepreneurs, and more jobs would also result. In a phrase, a better future.

AFS is waging an aggressive effort to improve the public policies that affect the casting industry. We have taken OSHA to court over its crystalline silica rule, and are a part of separate litigation against EPA over its “clean power” and ozone rules. Our tax system has created an uncertain environment that hinders our industry’s ability to compete, and AFS is therefore advocating tax reform. Metalcasters face trade challenges from trade-distorting policies and practices abroad, and AFS is advocating a more aggressive trade policy to combat these practices to strengthen our manufacturing base.

AFS is also encouraging Congress and the Trump administration to make a commitment to long-overdue investments in infrastructure. Over 30 percent of casting production goes into infrastructure—accounting for 3 million annual tons of castings. Finally, AFS is opposing a recent Treasury Department draft rule that would remove legitimate valuation practices for estate, gift, and generation-skipping taxes.

On the workforce development front, a total of 38 classroom classes have been redesigned over the last several years. AFS is now offering e-learning that makes metalcasting industry talent development more affordable and convenient than ever.

AFS is also playing a leading role in technology development and transfer, which positions the casting industry to meet the ever-evolving technology needs of its customers for many years to come.

Click here to see this story as it appears in Modern Casting

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