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Casting Getaway

On a much-needed getaway weekend, I embarked on my first camping trip. After a couple of days “roughing it” in the woods (ok, it was a campsite), we decided to head to the neighboring town of Galena, Ill., for what I felt was a much needed check back into the real world.

To my surprise, upon exiting the visitor’s center, a sign stood before me, announcing a Grey Iron Foundry. Yes, I was a little excited, thinking I would walk right in, announce I work for AFS and tour the metalcasting facility. But I quickly realized that might be a bit of a bold approach. Also, they were closed for Saturday. I was a little disappointed.

As I walked around Galena, I found my mind was tuned in to every casting I could spot—from old, antique cast-iron stoves for sale at antique shops to the sewer gates, announcing themselves at each street corner. It’s true—castings are all around us. Oddly enough, a year ago this time, I would not have given it a second thought, let alone understand the word ‘metal casting.’

Casting buyers and designers have a unique opportunity to become involved in world of metalcasting and see what others do not. Take that opportunity—visit your metalcaster’s facility, sign up for an Introduction to Metalcasting course—and take advantage of it. Share in the age old business of casting.


Cupolas, Crucibles and Communication

AFS offers a wealth of training resources on this more than 5,000-year-old industry, its various techniques and their applications.  As new methods are created in any industry, best practices develop through an ongoing engineering process that often involves trial and error.

 
Reporting and writing about metalcasting affords those of us on the journalistic side an opportunity to watch these developments take place. Our role is to gather and share your stories, providing a forum for continuous learning and the presentation of new ideas.  


According to “The Process of Metalcasting,”a video available from AFS, “In all methods, the key to quality metalcasting is a direct line of communication between the part manufacturer, the design engineer, the pattern maker and the foundry.”


The same can be said for the quality of content we run in Metal Casting Design & Purchasing. I’ve spoken with a few of you in this, my first week with the AFS, and I look forward to talking to more of you in the coming weeks and months. The line of communication is open, so please feel free to contact me anytime.  


dkapel@afsinc.org


Hello, metalcasters

I’m getting started this week as senior editor for the American Foundry Society’s publications. My background is in manufacturing business magazines covering a variety of industries. Most recently, I worked for a national publication serving commercial printers. That experience took me to a couple of different metalcasting facilities in Germany, which cast the press iron for machinery used to print magazines such as Metal Casting Design & Purchasing.

It’s a fascinating process, and I’m looking forward to meeting many of you and learning more about the industry. If you’d like to reach me, I am available at dkapel@afsinc.org.

See you on the casting beat—Denise Kapel

I’m getting started this week as senior editor for the American Foundry Society’s publications. My background is in manufacturing business magazines covering a variety of industries. Most recently, I worked for a national publication serving commercial printers. That experience took me to a couple of different metalcasting facilities in Germany, which cast the press iron for machinery used to print magazines such as Metal Casting Design & Purchasing.

It’s a fascinating process, and I’m looking forward to meeting many of you and learning more about the industry. If you’d like to reach me, I am available at dkapel@afsinc.org.

See you on the casting beat—Denise Kapel


Use Your Platform

Manufacturers, are you feeling popular these days? As political candidates drum up funds for the big push for votes this fall, much of their attention is turned on the manufacturing industry and its job-making prospects. President Obama and presidential candidate Gov. Mitt Romney, as well as candidates running for Congress, have been making the rounds through major manufacturing hubs to spread their message. They want to convince you their platform will best meet your needs, but they want to listen to your thoughts, too. Following are five ideas to use this election season as a chance to spread your own platform.
1. Write your Congress candidates, no matter whether you plan to vote for them, and explain what policies would enable your company to create more jobs. Invite them to tour your plant.
2. Write or email your newspaper.
3. Produce a short, simple video of your business operations with commentary on how the health of your company affects the health of the economy.
4. Attend fundraising events.
5. Get tweeting. Many candidates are on twitter. A smart tweet from you on a pertinent election topic could be retweeted to thousands of followers.
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